H. Pylori: Important Things to Know

H. Pylori is a common infection that is easily knocked out by electromagnetic frequencies. Of course, as Royal Rife said, if you can’t find the right frequency, nothing will work. People are sometimes stumped when I tell them exactly how I work with a Cameron Aurometer, an FSCAN2, an ABPA, and an F160 to precisely identify the frequency of an organism. They become totally preoccupied with the Cameron Aurameter, a high tech dowsing device. What they need to be preoccupied with is the biological science so they know where to look for frequencies, what type of frequencies to look for, how many and what type of frequencies are likely to be required, and the best way to develop an effective protocol to deliver the frequencies to the target organism.

Studying the scientific literature is the most important thing. You will never get the right frequencies unless you understand the biology of the organism. The next most important thing is to have an objective means to crosscheck results with a device like the FSCAN, an approved medical device in Switzerland for years and now in Germany.

In addition, having a group of researchers test a frequency set on multiple individuals and providing essential feedback on results is important. Ideally, 100% of the people get a positive result 100% of the time.



H. pylori tips off host. Pathogenic bug is shown to trigger inflammation by injecting peptidoglycan. But why?

Cathy Holding, The Scientist, 18 Oct 2004

Helicobacter pylori triggers gastric inflammation by injecting peptidoglycan from its cell wall into epithelial cells, where it is recognized by an intracellular pathogen recognition molecule, researchers report in Nature Immunology this week.

Richard Ferrero and colleagues at Institut Pasteur in France note in their paper that H. pylori strains carrying the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) are known to be more often associated with severe gastric inflammation and its pathogenic consequences in humans, but the mechanism underlying the link had been poorly understood…

“It’s interesting biology because the organism is signaling the host by purposefully—adaptively—injecting pieces of its own cell wall into the [host] cells. So one of the questions that raises is, why is H. pylori doing that?” said Martin J. Blaser, from New York University School of Medicine.

The question should be viewed in the context of H. pylori as an often lifelong infection, said Blaser, who was not involved in the study. “I think that part of the message here is that H. pylori has co-evolved with humans, and it’s evolved in a way that provides for persistence of the bacterium over decades.”

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