AFM Acute Flaccid Myletis – CDC Surveillance Previous item Hepatitis C Frequencies Next item SV40 Version 2.0 Frequencies

AFM Acute Flaccid Myletis – CDC Surveillance

CDC is concerned about AFM, a serious illness that we do not know the cause of or how to prevent it.

  • CDC is investigating the increase in AFM in 2016. As of September 2016, 89 people in 33 states were confirmed to have AFM.
  • Even with an increase in cases in 2016, AFM remains a very rare disease (less than one in a million).
  • While the AFM case count for 2016 is less than the 2014 case count, CDC is concerned about the increase in cases in recent months.
  • CDC is intensifying efforts to understand the cause and risk factors of AFM.
  • It’s always important to practice disease prevention steps, like washing your hands, staying up-to-date on vaccines, and protecting yourself from mosquito bites.

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a rare illness that anyone can get. It affects a person’s nervous system, specifically the spinal cord. AFM can result from a variety of causes, including viral infections.

Beginning in August 2014, CDC received an increase in reports of people across the United States with AFM for which no cause could be found. Since then, CDC has been actively investigating this illness. We continue to receive reports of sporadic cases of AFM. From January 1 to September 30, 2016, a total of 89 people in 33 states across the country were confirmed to have AFM.

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